At ENTACC, our patients are our priority.

Sinusitis

About Sinusitis

Sinusitis can occur after a cold or an allergy attack. Approximately 35 million Americans suffer from sinusitis. That contributes to 22 million doctor office visits per year. It is directly responsible for many missed work days and costs society billions of dollars. It is 18 percent more common over the past 10 years and is the third most common diagnosis used for antibiotic prescriptions. Sinusitis develops when the small openings to the sinuses are blocked and bacteria is trapped within the sinuses and multiplies. This causes the sinus lining to become swollen and the inflammation causing infection begins. This results in sinus pain, pressure, the production of pus and fever.

Usually an antibiotic is sufficient to treat acute sinusitis, especially when combined with expectorants and decongestants and plenty of water to hydrate you. If in spite of this therapy, the infection continues for a period of 12 weeks, the condition could become chronic sinusitis. These chronic infections are often treated with nasal steroid sprays, oral steroids, antibiotics as well as expectorants, decongestants and proper hydration. Some of these patients may require endoscopic sinus surgery if the medical treatment does not offer a proper response and improvement. Recent innovation in endoscopic sinus surgery allows image guidance technology to assist our surgeons to more completely remove the sinus disease during surgery, allowing the patients to have a much better result. Also, in-office balloon sinuplasty is becoming more common for a less invasive approach to treat chronic sinusitis. These balloons are inflated while in the small openings of the sinuses and once deflated allow the sinus passages to drain more effectively into the nasal chamber by enlarging the sinus openings. This balloon procedure is often done while the patient is awake and in our office. We at ENTACC offer our patients many options to treat sinusitis with outstanding results for this very common malady.